Contact Eric

Best way to contact Eric is to post on Baen’s Bar at http://bar.baen.com. He wanders in and out of Baen’s Bar almost daily, monitoring several of the conferences personally. You can login to visit and read the conferences as a guest, but you will have to register to be able to participate, that is to say post any comments. We have a strict ‘No Hitting Rule’ at the Bar, so you don’t need to worry about wandering into a flame war. Just announce that you’re new and you’ll be gladly shown the ropes. Check out the Baen’s Bar FAQs listed on the left of the message board at Baen’s Bar. You will most likely find Eric posting to these conferences at Baen’s Bar:

► 1632 Tech Manual (Eric’s conference dealing with the 1632 universe)
► BuShips (David Weber’s conference)
► Classic SF (Eric’s conference devoted to his editing work)
► Dixon’s Vixen (Misty Lackey’s conference)
► Doctor Monkey (Dave Freer’s conference)
► Honorverse (Dave Weber’s conference devoted to the Honor Harrington universe)
► Mutter of Demons (Eric’s conference)

193 Responses to Contact Eric

  1. Berryb says:

    Hello,

    Great fan. Love it, well played sir well played..

    But, the reason I am typing you is because I would love to see 1632 put into movies / series.. If i was a hollywood guy I would make it into film. But, I am not but, if I would love to see it I bet many others would also.. Who do we need to talk to to get this on HBO??

  2. Jim Macdonald says:

    In “Jim Baen’s Universe-Vol 1 Num 4, at the end of “Fish Story, Episode 4″ it said “TO BE CONTINUED”.

    Q: Where? Has it been continued anywhere? etc. etc.

  3. Corey Adams says:

    I was wandering if there was any progress on the Rivers of War series? Also, is there a possibility of it becoming an anthology series like Ring of Fire?

  4. Bill Simpson says:

    Eric,
    Love your 1632 world and have read everything so far, ( and Belisarius too!). Several questions concerning loose ends, when will LCDR Eddie Cantrell and Anna Catherina be getting married?

  5. Alan Pugh says:

    Eric,

    I’m in the process of rereading 1632 for the 3rd or 4th time. Just wanted to let you know that it is among my top 5 favorite books that I’ve ever read. Given the number of books I’ve read over the past 48 years that is truly high praise. Thanks for writing it. I’ve enjoyed the rest of the many books in the 1632 universe but there is something about that first book that touches me in a way that few other books have. Thanks!

  6. Mark says:

    Eric,

    I am in the progress of reading and writing a paper on your book, 1812: Rivers of War for a history class. The paper is going to compare and contrast differences between your portrayal of historical figures and events with what is in the non-fiction historical record. You obviously change some events in coming up with an alternative history that avoids the Trail of Tears, but I was wondering how closely you kept characters like Sam Houston, or Andrew Jackson to fact?

  7. Rhuaidhri Tynan says:

    Hi Eric,

    I am reading Assiti Shards series. After the first one I got the impression you were fudging the history to make in appear that all the atrocities during the period were conducted by the Catholics and wondered whether Cromwell would make an appearance in the series and if so what you would say.

    I’m sorry that my suspicions turned out to be well founded. Cromwell did not just put the garrison to the sword. In his own report to Parliament he said they killed “many civilians” there. His own figures listed for the garrison were 2800 dead royalist “troops” Many comtempary acounts put the figure of civilans killed at 3-4000.

    His own atitude in is own words at the time was “I am persuaded that this is a righteous judgement of God on these barbarous wretches, who have imbrued their hands with so much innocent blood; and that it will tend to prevent the effusion of blood for the future, which are satisfactory grounds for such actions which cannot otherwise but work remorse and regret”

    While he may not in England have been considered merciful having only killed 100 out of the 400 who surrenered at Basing House (which is still a lot more than a typical decimation) his actions in Ireland were unparrelled in English or Irish history at the time.

    This act which was only one of a number carried out along the east cost which contrary to you ascertions he had more than enough time to cover as Ireland is not that large and the east cost route he took had good roads for the time.

    Cromwell’s was not the only force operating at the time and there were thousands of other put to death by other New Model Army Forces.

    You totally ignore the Penal Laws and it’s affects and the death toll resulting of the forced settelement which Cromwell instituted and while the Irish killed people in 1641 you neglect to mention these were settlers and the vast majority likely died from hunger and exposure after the Irish reclaimed the land and homes that had been forcefully taken from them in the first place. All in all maybe 14,000 died which not a small number but it is smaller the at least 200,000 Irish Catholic lives that were lost during the period. Even that is small compared to the millions who perished under Protestant rule from hunger in a land where there was plenty of food.

    I’m not a fan of the Catholic Church myself but it’s clear to me the Protestants were every bit as blood thirsty in hatred as the Catholics were in theirs and persecuted Catholics with just as much vigour when they could as the Catholics did to them when they were able.

  8. Dan Kaplanek says:

    1632… Man this would make an awesome tv series!

    • James A Turner says:

      I agree. Each novel would be a mini-series, and the stories in the Gazettes and Ring of Fire books would be the weekly shows in the series.

  9. Rhuaidhri Tynan says:

    Hi Eric just finished 1634 – The Galileo Affari and while I’ve enjoyed the series so far I’ll have to take issue with some of what you wrote.

    Firstly I’m disappointed that Francis Bacon is not mentioned, I would think that if you asked experimental scientists the vast majority would agree that he is the Father of Modern Experimental Science since he gave us “The Method”. Having said that I’m happy to see some names not normally recognised for there work.

    Much of what you write is true but your incorrrect on some specifics. Galileos major contribution as you say was mechanics but that led to Netwon work on mechanics, his three Laws of Motion. Netwon did not derive his 3 laws of motion from Kepler. Rather he showed that his Three Laws combined with the Law of Gravity were equivalent to Keplers Three Laws of planetary Motion. In fact it’s likely he used his 3 laws and Keplers 3 laws to derive the Law of Gravity and that’s often the way it is done in Physics courses today.

    However Newton’s 3 Laws followed Galileos work on mechanics and while it’s possible Newton may have come up with them independantly, Galileo had already stated the first Law of Motion and may already have know of laws 2 and 3 although he is not known to have stated them in a similar manner. In fact Galileo may have gone much further than Newton thanks to his experiments and it’s likely he at least had some notion of the law of conservation of momentum. In fact along with Newton and Galileo, Hobbes and Decartes also had also discovered a number of these principles.

    I also have to take issue with the notion that Galileo did not give credit where it was due. He credited Kepler in his writings on Telescopes because Kepler wrote The Optical Part of Astronomy and Dioptrice which along with influencing Galileo would be fundamental to Newton’s work on Optics.

    I also have to point out that Kepler was a Protestant and was amongst the first to support the Copernican model which refutes your arguement with respect to the Protectant contribution to science during the period and their attitude to the Coperican model.

  10. Nav F. says:

    Hi, its been almost two years since the last main spine novel, eagerly waiting for the 1637. Hope it comes out this year. Thanks.

  11. Walter Manderson says:

    I love the 1632 series, all the formats. Could the E Books be lengthen by a few more pages. Keep up the great work.

  12. Sarah Keller says:

    Mr. Flint, I was wondering if you could offer some advice. I am not sure what the title for this job is, but I know that, when a book is being readied for publication, someone works with the author to correct errors in grammar, spelling, syntax, flow and punctuation. My skills in this area are not perfect, but they are very good. What is the title for the people who do this, and do you have any suggestions on how best to prepare for this job, in terms of education and such, or on how a person could direct their career-the first job to apply for, how to impress the people who do the hiring and promoting-to eventually get that job? I know that you are very busy writing books my husband loves and with your editing, so if you can’t answer, I will completely understand, but just in case you are able, thank you very much.
    Sarah Keller

  13. Joe Rogers says:

    I have everyone of the 1632 series and love it. I have often thought the eventual episode would be place 1oo to 200 years in the future. Giving a reprise to the rise of the German people and eventual true United states of Europe that could encompass most of western Europe. Around our house the name of Flint is not repeated as that was my wife’s first husband (Keith Flint). Also you did mention one of my ancestors Lion Gardiner (english adventurer). My Grandmother’s maiden name was McCormick. Thanks for an interesting series.

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  15. Trevor D says:

    Are we ever going to get a sequel to 1824: The Arkansas War? I love that series and want MOAR!

  16. Matthew says:

    Ayo,

    Thought you might like these “Mad Science”/”Technology Art” inventions and experiments.

    Might provide some inspiration for Sci-Fi and fantasy Tech.

    Some like the water computer tech can even go “both ways”, could be imagined developed high end nano-tech into a metal-oragnic life form cross between machines and biology, or as a more primitive version of computing where semi-conductors have not be introduced yet.

    Alot of them revolve around salt water replacing semi-conductors for computing.. after all, all life on earth can be though of as “water based computers” :)

    Everything creative commons free to copy/edit/sell. Always happy to collaborate, just love to inspire creativity, invention, and experimentation

    Hope you like.

    You may also like these writing systems, great for both futuristic alien and ancient fantasy environments.

    Mad Science Tech Art : http://dscript.org/inventions.pdf

    Dscript 2D writing system : http://dscript.org/dscript.pdf
    Makes great art and calligraphy

    Wire Script 2D/3D : http://dscript.org/wirescript.pdf
    Turn text into 3D ornaments/jewellery/etc..

    Live long and geek out :)
    Matt

  17. Joe Mitko says:

    Read all three offerings regarding Karres starting with James Schmitz original “Witches of Karres and ending with your recent “Sorceress of Karres”. I have to say. You did an excellent job of carrying on Schmitz’s characters, the planet of Karres and its universe. Hopefully there will be at least one more installment to wrap up the various relationships i.e.. do Pausert and Goth finally marry? Does Pausert ever become an accomplished witch? What happens to the Lewitt?

  18. ELLEN BENODIN says:

    26 June 2014

    Ellen C. Benodin
    122 Pronghorn Place
    Montgomery, TX 77316

    Mssrs. Eric Flint and
    Charles E. Gannon
    C/o Baen Publishing Enterprises
    P.O. Box 1403
    Riverdale, NY 10471

    Re: Typos in 1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies, 2014, hard copy

    Gentlemen:

    As an addict of the entire 1632 series, much of it read in eBook format, I’ve come to expect and forgive (due to the price) poorer editing in the electronic versions. I was surprised, however, to find a number of typos in the hardcopy of this latest contribution to the storyline. I can’t promise that the “catches” are comprehensive – they are only what jumped out at me on first reading. Here they are, should you wish to correct them in any future printings:

    Page (in hardcopy) Line/Paragraph Words
    206 5th paragraph, 4th line down “more a decade”; should be “more than a decade…”
    296 4th paragraph, 3d full line up from bottom of paragraph “Cornelis Jol brought world…”; should be “… brought word…”
    434 Next to last line on page “be believed”; should be “he believed…”
    503 2d and 3d paragraphs alternating between “Equiluz” and Eguiluz”; I assume the “q” is correct
    506 3d full paragraph, 8th line from top of paragraph “Eguiluz” again
    513 3d full paragraph, 6th line from top of paragraph “of be able”; should be “of being able”
    541 4th paragraph “less impatient that du Plessis…”; should be “less impatient than du Plessis….”

    With gratitude for many enjoyable hours of reading,

    Sincerely,

    Ellen C. Benodin

  19. You might be interested in an article in the summer 2014 Threepenny Review about West Virginia. The article is by Richard Rapport, entitled The Late Senator Byrd’s Political Advisors. He’s a physician who practiced in West VA in the early 70s and returned for a visit many years later. I amused to find a mention of the former Grantville Hospital. Humor aside, it’s a worthwhile read.

  20. ivanimbro says:

    Just started 1824. Hoping to find a young Choctaw of the Innominee.

  21. Cody Adams says:

    As a History buff I have to say I REALLY enjoy reading the 1632 series. I remember the first time I saw the original 1632 book with the 17th century pikemen and a pickup truck full of gun toting Americans, my first thought was “Whaaa..?” Then I read the book and haven’t stopped since. It’s really great to read a fiction work with some of my favorite historical figures (Like Gustavus and Cromwell) and get to see their personalities in action. I just bought one of the 1636 books today and can’t wait to blaze through it. Also PLEASE bring back Gustavus Adolphus! ;)

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